fbpx

Things you certainly miss from the 2000s

The 2000s were not just a wonderful decade from your old calendar. It was a melting pot of music, movies, fashion, literature (and everything cool) that was deemed unruly but kickstarted a new wave of culture in Bangladesh.

At the turn of the 21st century, globalization was having a massive impact on our life in Dhaka. Yours truly, like any other 90’s kid, have been part of the following things that made us giddy and still aches our heart to go back to the 2000s.

1. CDs

Courtesy: Bangla CD Covers

Before piracy took over the country, the premium medium for listening to music was CD. Compact discs sold like hot cakes prior to the advent of illegal websites like Doridro or Fusionbd.

Tahsan, the famed celebrity was reminiscing about the golden days of physical music on a radio show saying, “This one morning, I got a call from my record label G-series. They congratulated me as my solo album “Krittodasher Nirban” sold out a million copies. They also wanted me to stop by their office to collect the royalty.” You see, people didn’t hesitate to buy music legally. It’s just the internet who interfered and the rest is a tragedy.

2. FM radio

It was 2006 when I was playing around with a gigantic radio. I was rotating the notch in hopes to catch the Bangladesh Betar. But to my utter surprise, I found radio Today, the first 24-hour radio station of the country. The station was running its test transmission. This was the first time I heard the word ‘Radio Jockey’, a jargon unheard of among the millennials of Dhaka. And thank God, the FM stations brought diversity in their playlist unlike Bangladesh Betar and rose to stratospheric popularity.

Soon enough, a couple of other stations joined the cohort and catered audio entertainment to a generation who barely tuned to a radio station beforehand.

Rasel bhai…or Loveguru, anyone?

3. ETV

If you had cable tv subscription at your home in the early 2000s, consider yourself lucky. Ekushey television was launched in 2000. The only open terrestrial channel (other than BTV) became a household name across the country.

Kids and adults who used to nag their parents for dish antenna were soon engrossed in shows produced by the channel. Every drama, telefilm, dubbed series or music videos ETV premiered turned into a cultural phenom.

Who could forget the witty Debashish Biswash hosting ‘Pather Panchali’ or the graceful Ahmed Rubel starring in the horror series ‘Pret’? I used to wait for music video reruns around 6 pm just before I dragged myself for studies. Those were the days!

4. The Underground scene

A new wave of band music was emerging from the underground scene. Limited fanbase and genres which have never been done before by local musicians were prerequisites of the UG movement. Bands like Black, Artcell, Cryptic Fate, Arbovirus and many more notable names became part of this journey and are still going strong with their stellar on stage presence.

Read more: Great Bangladeshi bands that disappeared after their debut album

Just imagine some kid walking into a CD store to discover the newly released record of Artcell. The fantasy gives me shivers down the spine!

5. Cyber cafe

In the 2000s, a few fortunate people had access to super slow dial-up internet. For the rest of us, we had cyber cafes. Every alley of Dhaka city swarmed with cyber cafes, and I don’t remember any of them serving caffeine drinks of any sort.

The Cybercafe was the place where cubicles were set up for your privacy so that you browse the ‘Yahoo messenger’ era internet for 30 TK/hour.

Raise your hand if you took a friend to a cafe to open your first Facebook account.

6. Landline

Land phones were still relevant in the 2000s. Talking to your friends or significant other was made easier by landlines. People even fell in love with strangers by calling the wrong number in hopes to meet someone of the opposite sex. To have a landline connection, one had to go through seemingly endless paperwork. Can you imagine some govt employee giving you hell because you want to have a landline at your home? Gen Z would be bewildered to hear such fairy tales.

Do you ever feel burned out over all the technological amenities that claim to make our life easier? I certainly do. The list can go on since there was no shortage of awesomeness in the 2000s. Yellow taxi, film camera and Tin Goyenda is just a few other names that still makes us nostalgic.

Dragon Ball Super: Broly- Everything we’ve ever wanted

We asked for it every time STAR Cineplex had brought a new movie in. But to be quite honest, we didn’t think we’d live to see the day when we’ll watch an anime in Bangladeshi theatres. When we sat down to watch it for the first time, it felt like a dream come true!

And as for the movie itself, all we can say is that he is back, for good this time. Somehow, he is better than ever before. Dragon Ball Super: Broly blows all expectations out of proportion.

Dragon Ball and Broly

Fans of the Dragon Ball series have long adored it for a multitude of reasons. For most, the series defined their childhoods. That is a very subjective statement. What is objectively great about Dragon Ball is its massive and varied gallery of supporting characters, especially the villains. Arguably the most intriguing of who is Broly, the legendary Super Saiyan.

Fans obsess over Broly- the mysterious and savage warrior of seemingly no principle aside from pure mayhem. For many, he is the favorite character in the series. Established from the first Dragon Ball Z movie of his, Broly is one the last surviving members of Goku and Vegeta’s race, an untamable and monstrous individual of pure power. He is the only Dragon Ball villain to be featured in more than one movie. However, the thing about him is, he is a movie villain only and thus not part of the greater Dragon Ball canon. Toriyama and Co. decided to change that, and the result is marvelous.

Read more: https://hifipublic.com/en/2018/09/17/why-everyone-should-watch-anime/

New and improved: Not even his final form

Dragon Ball Super: Broly brings the titular character into the main universe continuation of the series and thus gives him a brand new origin to suit. It is still as close to the original as it needs to be though. Fans tend to get somewhat touchy about rehashes and revisions of their favorite characters. This movie pulls off the reboot as well as can be.

A large part of what made Broly into such a favorite in the previous continuity was the mystique surrounding him and his violence. There was some explanation to it, but it did not feel satisfactory to me and Broly felt like a really cool but incomplete character. This one does a much better job of portraying Broly as an actual person and his driving forces. Not to worry though, he is still as cool and as buff as ever. He is still out to get everyone unfortunate enough to anger him (mostly Goku). Just now, he has a reason to.

One would expect the movie to follow the character into being a complete revamp, but thankfully it is not so. It does not just ignore the previous incarnation of Broly, the movie is self-aware in the sense that it often throws shade to the past incarnation of Broly and his tale. We found that very rewarding as a long time follower.

About the movie itself

First, we need to talk about the animation quality. Super started with objectively bad animation quality. We have come a long way from there. It was evident in the anime and more so in this movie. Dragon Ball: Super is one of the most gorgeous looking animated movies we have ever seen. The animation is not just beautiful but crisp and consistent. You can notice the amount of effort that went into producing this. Toriyama himself mostly made the character designs, so you can bet on its quality. The signature fighting scenes of Dragon Ball have arguably never been better. Scene transitions are seamless. At no point do you not want to be looking at the screen.

The story is surprisingly rich by Dragon Ball standards.

At least in the movies, Dragon Ball has been mostly about cool fight scenes, of which this has no shortage. However, the importance of story has been paid attention to, evident from the fleshed out origins and motivations at work behind each character. Previously fans have complained about the lack of consistency in the storytelling of Toriyama. In this movie, the story is wonderfully structured and perfectly addresses previous storylines that follow up to the movie.  The redemption arc every Dragon Ball villain seems to have is a bother for many fans. Nevertheless, do not worry. Frieza is still as evil as ever.

Verdict

Dragon Ball Super: Broly is a wonderful film experience for newcomers and longtime fans alike. 9/10 from us easily.

It is a beautiful, emotional and action-packed ride that made the old and cynical partisan in us smile and hope for the future of the story introduced in this film. So, hurry up and go watch it.

Book your tickets from here.