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Greta Thunberg: Earth’s safe haven at work

With the heartbreaking Amazon forest loss, melting icebergs in Antarctica and many other disasters, the global crisis is increasing. According to UN demographics, one natural climate crisis is occurring every week around the world. In between all this chaos and loss, one young 16 years old stood out to aid to this endless catastrophe.

Read more: Who is Greta Thunberg and other questions you were too embarrassed to ask

Who is Greta Thunberg?

Born in Sweden, Greta Thunberg is a rising environmental activist who is spreading global awareness to the risk of climate change. She has raised questions against politicians for their lack of action against this crisis which affects the entire world.

Last year, Greta took time off of her school to demonstrate the Swedish parliament about climate loss. Soon, most of the school students, including her classmates joined the protest. They organised a school climate strike movement under the name “Fridays for the Future”. After Thunberg addressed the issues in the 2018 United Nations Climate Change Conference, students all over the world including Bangladesh, UK, Japan, India and Germany joined the protest in their own way.

A real leader’s power of consciousness

Despite being a 16-year-old, Greta Thunberg is known for her blunt and realist responses to questions. But Great herself has her own story. She was diagnosed with Asperger’s, a form of autism four years ago. In an interview with the BBC, she mentions

Being different is a gift. It makes me see things from outside the box. I don’t easily fall for lies, I can see through things. If I would’ve been like everyone else, I wouldn’t have started this school strike for instance. We introverts can make our voices heard”

The Global Climate Strike

The global climate strike we all knew we needed is here. People from all over the world have taken to the street for a better world not for themselves, but for everyone across the world. Thunberg and her community’s voice has reached all over the world and now their demands are just as much as ours. The strike started from September 20th and will continue until 27th of September.

According to the article by The Guardian, trade unions representing hundreds of millions of people around the world mobilized in support, employees left their workplaces, doctors and nurses marched and workers at firms like Amazon, Google and Facebook have now joined the strikes.

In the estimated 185 countries, the protests are different depending upon the challenging crisis that they are having to go through. But at the end of the day, the message and the activists are united for one thing and one thing only. A safe space for nature, animals and humans.

What’s next?

The demand for ending the age of fossil fuels invested by different banks, finding a reasonable solution for a healthier environment is the most essential demands. However, what happens next is up to us. How we see the world and decide to protect it is solely upon our principle.

In a country like Bangladesh were young children still have hope and strike for a positive change, it is time to end our lack of motivation for a better country.

The unhealthy practise of “When in Rome, do as the Romans do” needs to stop.

Educating ourselves with the burning questions of Sundarban, excessive use of plastic materials and polythene bags are just the tip of the iceberg.

By the words of Greta Thunberg herself which left the world in a gasp and sudden rush of epiphany:

“Adults keep saying, ‘We owe it to young people to give them hope.’ But I don’t want your hope. I don’t want you to be hopeful. I want you to panic. I want you to feel the fear I feel every day, and then I want you to act. I want you to act as you would in a crisis. I want you to act as if our house is on fire. Because it is.”  

Who is Greta Thunberg and other questions you were too embarrassed to ask

With the heartbreaking Amazon forest loss, melting icebergs in Antarctica and many other disasters, the global crisis is increasing. According to UN demographics, one natural climate crisis is occurring every week around the world. In between all this chaos and loss, one young 16 years old stood out to aid to this endless catastrophe.

Read more: Everything you need to know about the Amazon forest fire

Who is Greta Thunberg?

Who is Greta Thunberg and other questions you were too embarrassed to ask

Born in Sweden, Greta Thunberg is a 16 years old rising environmental activist who is spreading global awareness to the risk of climate change. She has raised questions against politicians for their lack of action against this crisis which affects the entire world.

Her bold actions had led her to become a global icon in the movement against climate change.

Why is Greta such a big deal?

Who is Greta Thunberg and other questions you were too embarrassed to ask

Last year, Greta took time off of her school to demonstrate the Swedish parliament about climate loss. It started as a lone fight but soon, most of the school students, including her classmates joined the protest. They organised a school climate strike movement under the name “Fridays for the Future”.

After Thunberg addressed the issues in the 2018 United Nations Climate Change Conference, students all over the world including Bangladesh, UK, Japan, India and Germany joined the protest in their own way.

Is climate change real?

Very much so. If you’re still not convinced enough to care about the climate, here are some statistics to help you out:

  • Carbon dioxide levels in the air are at their highest in 650,000 years
  • 18 of the 19 warmest years on record have occurred since 2001
  • 2016 was the warmest year on record.
  • Satellite data shows Earth’s polar ice sheets are losing mass
  • Global average sea level has risen nearly 7″ over the past 100 years

Has her protest made any difference?

Yes. Thanks to her, the global climate strike we all knew we needed is finally here. People from all over the world have taken to the street for a better world not for themselves, but for everyone across the world. Thunberg and her community’s voice has reached all over the world and now their demands are just as much as ours. The strike started from September 20th and will continue until 27th of September.

According to the article by The Guardian, trade unions representing hundreds of millions of people around the world mobilized in support, employees left their workplaces, doctors and nurses marched and workers at firms like Amazon, Google and Facebook have now joined the strikes.

In the estimated 185 countries, the protests are different depending upon the challenging crisis that they are having to go through. But at the end of the day, the message and the activists are united for one thing and one thing only. A safe space for nature, animals and humans.

How can we help?

Who is Greta Thunberg and other questions you were too embarrassed to ask

In a country like Bangladesh where young children still have hope and strike for a positive change, it is time to end our lack of motivation for a better country. The unhealthy practise of “When in Rome, do as the Romans do” needs to stop. Educating ourselves with the burning questions of Sundarban, excessive use of plastic materials and polythene bags are just the tip of the iceberg. Quote

“Adults keep saying, ‘We owe it to young people to give them hope.’ But I don’t want your hope. I don’t want you to be hopeful. I want you to panic. I want you to feel the fear I feel every day, and then I want you to act. I want you to act as you would in a crisis. I want you to act as if our house is on fire. Because it is.”  

By the words of Greta Thunsberg herself which left the world in gasp and sudden rush of epiphany.

Bengal Tigers may not survive the upcoming climate change

A scientific study warns of the risk of losing the Bengal Tigers because of climate change. The cats are around 500,000 land species whose survival is in question. According to a recent report by the UN, the survival of this species is in question. This brings upon various other issues regarding climate change and its effects on life around the world.

Our mangrove forest is deteriorating

The Sundarbans is a 10,000 square kilometers of marshy land, filled with various flora and fauna. It stretches from Bangladesh to India, making it one of the biggest mangrove forest in the world. This forest is well known for its rich eco-system and hundreds of animal species. However, scientists are not sure if the Sundarbans can sustain one of its most important animals, the Royal Bengal Tiger. Researchers reported in the journal ‘Science of the Total Environment’ that changes operated by a warming planet will be “enough to decimate” a few hundreds or more of the tigers. According to their research, by 2070 there will be no suitable habitats for the tigers to survive.

Recent research shows frightening results for the tigers

Bengal Tigers may not survive the upcoming climate change

Climate change has already endangered many species. Plenty are struggling to survive under the constant changes in the temperature and our environment. Sharif A.Mukul, the lead author of the report on the Sundarbans, researched for risks beyond the rising sea. Sea levels rising alone could amount to these cats lose half of their habitat. Mukul, an assistant professor of environmental management at Independent University, Bangladesh, believes that cyclones and other natural disasters can, destroy their habitat. They can also cause the outbreak of diseases and shortages of food.

Prerna Singh Bindra, author of The Vanishing: India’s Wildlife said that the number of tigers is going to shrink with time. The reason behind this is because the migrating of the tigers is not a ‘viable option’. Since there are no undisturbed places for these animals in a crowded planet.

Questionable actions from the authorities

Fiddling with the laws, the development of industries and factories around the forest brings in several questions. Department of Environment has permitted at least 190  industrial plants in the ecologically critical area (ECA) around the Sundarbans, claiming that those factories have taken enough precautions on pollution. These factories include gas cylinder manufacturers, oil refineries, fish farms, hatcheries, saline water refineries and many more.

The problematic regulation of the increase of industries around the habitat of thousands of animal species, the extreme increase of heat and the fear of natural disasters have left researchers to wonder if proper precautions will help them protect the tigers after all.