Watch a Bangladeshi filmmaker’s award-winning movie, “Life in Other Words”

“Witness an ordinary family having an extraordinary day,” is how we are invited to watch this short film which premiered in Bangladesh on the 11th, on Youtube. The film was previously available on Amazon Prime.

The short film includes the trials and tribulations in the lives of the Kabir family– from a son’s academic struggles to a hard-working woman’s tested patience in dealing with men harassing her during her commute. However, it is the themes of hope and joy, found in what brings families together and brightens an awful day, that will resonate among many.

Read more: French movie “Fahim” to portray the story of Bangladeshi chess prodigy

International recognition

‘Life in Other Words’ has received various nominations, including a nomination for Best Short Foreign Film, Comedy at NewFilmmakers Los Angeles (NFMLA) – Best of NFMLA Awards. The film received an honourable mention for comedy at San Jose International Short Film Festival and was a nominee for Best Short Film Award at the Bahamas International Film Festival in December 2017. In 2017, the film won Best Short Film and Best original screenplay at the Gold Movie Awards. The film was a nominee at the International Filmmaker Festival of World Cinema, London in 2018 for best comedy, best short foreign language film and best original screenplay for foreign language film.

“Great comedy filmmakers are hard to come by and Athar will certainly be one to watch. His timing is excellent, as is his mise en scène, and the variety of filmmaking devices he shows he can utilise well is impressive. What I am trying to say, I guess, is that this is Great in Other Words”

Chris Olson, UK Film Review, said about the film and its director, Abrar Athar

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Through Her Eyes: Celebrating and inspiring women filmmakers in Bangladesh

Women have been making films from the beginning of film production history but when it comes to nam a few, we realize how strikingly less number of women are prominent in the field than men filmmakers around the world. In Bangladesh, we currently see a number of women filmmakers actively creating and working in all genres of filmmaking; women like Samia Zaman, Meher Afroz Shaon and  Shuchanda only to name a few. These women set an example for female film enthusiasts around the world given how it still remains a challenge for a woman to be a film director and continue to create in this line of work. ‘Through Her Eyes’ is an attempt to inspire women in this field and celebrate those who carved out that opportunity for themselves despite the challenges.

What is Through Her Eyes?

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In cooperation with the International Film Initiative of Bangladesh (IFIB), Goethe-Institut Bangladesh, launched a new film screening and discussion series “Through Her Eyes – A space to watch and discuss films with women filmmakers of Bangladesh” on Sunday, 20th January, 2019 at 5 PM.

It is a series of screening sessions of movies directed by prominent Bangladeshi women filmmakers, followed by discussion sessions with them, the entry being free for all.

They will be screening a movie on every third Sunday of each month at the Goethe-Institut auditorium at 5 pm for everyone to join and celebrate & inspire women in the film industry. It is undoubtedly an amazing opportunity for both male and female film enthusiasts, students, academics, professionals and people from all walks of life to come together to watch award-winning films by women filmmakers currently working in Bangladesh and to interact with them directly at the end of the screening.

What happened on the first day?

As part of the initiative, the first day included a screening of the film “Under Construction” directed by Rubaiyat Hossain that was followed by a highly interactive Q&A session held at Goethe-Institut Bangladesh auditorium. The film is a realistic representation of the life of a modern Muslim woman struggling to find herself in the sprawl of male-dominated urban Bangladesh.

Film synopsis:

Still from the film Under Construction

In the constantly changing dynamic city of Dhaka, Roya, an actress in her early thirties, has to face her first challenge. She has been playing the same part repeatedly for years now, working for a stage director who now thinks she’s getting too old in spite of her young age. She enters a deep introspection about her life, her desires, her art and her place in the patriarchal society. Rubaiyat Hossain’s film Under Construction provides the portrait of a woman, whose life is still under construction.

The guests were clearly impressed by the emphasis on the details in the film and the story itself. One of the guests, Nadira who aspires to be a filmmaker told us she was overwhelmed to see a woman just like her creating something so brilliant. “The film was so impressively time-frame focused and realistic; the details were so carefully worked on. It was amazing!” she told us.

Why you should definitely go:

“The film inspired me to keep moving, no matter where life takes us. What really matters the most is if you’re still doing what you love”

Said Sadia who also told us that every moment of the event was worth it to her.

Besides the chance for us to come together and watch amazing creations of these inspiring women, the monthly programme will also be a space for young filmmakers, academics, film enthusiasts to engage in discussions, to learn about opportunities and career paths to critically interrogate societal relations. Moreover, the event promotes networking and will help us find out about the industry and important aspects for rising filmmakers like what kind of challenges should young filmmakers be ready for and what role can others play in this. What’s better? It’s free! So if you want to spend a Sunday evening watching something worthwhile, this is it!

Find out more about the event here: https://www.facebook.com/events/2099870576979355/

Keep an eye on the page of Goethe-Institut Bangladesh for the upcoming screening next month. Here’s the link to the page: https://www.facebook.com/goetheinstitut.bangladesh/ 

About the director of Under Construction:

Rubaiyat Hossain, one of Bangladesh’s handful of female filmmakers is known for her critically acclaimed debut feature film Meherjaan (2011) which due to its anti-war narrative, and critic of masculine nationalism from a feminine point of view, faced political and cultural outrage in Bangladesh. It was stripped down fromtheatres across the country only a week after its release and is still prohibited from being screened. While Under Construction (2015) is her second film that has won several national and international awards, she just finished the shoot for her upcoming film Made In Bangladesh.

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Having completed her B.A. in Women Studies from Smith College, USA and M.A. in South Asian Studies from the University of Pennsylvania, she is currently attending the Tisch School of Arts at New York University in Cinema Studies while living between Dhaka and New York making films. Besides being a filmmaker, she is an interdisciplinary research scholar and has worked for prominent women’s rights NGOs in Bangladesh like Ain O Shalish Kendra, Naripokkho and The Asia Foundation. Moreover, she was the assistant coordinator for the first international workshop of Sexuality and Rights organized by BRAC School of Public Health in 2007 and has also worked as a part-time lecturer in the Department of Economics and Social Sciences at BRAC University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Dragon Ball Super: Broly- Everything we’ve ever wanted

We asked for it every time STAR Cineplex had brought a new movie in. But to be quite honest, we didn’t think we’d live to see the day when we’ll watch an anime in Bangladeshi theatres. When we sat down to watch it for the first time, it felt like a dream come true!

And as for the movie itself, all we can say is that he is back, for good this time. Somehow, he is better than ever before. Dragon Ball Super: Broly blows all expectations out of proportion.

Dragon Ball and Broly

Fans of the Dragon Ball series have long adored it for a multitude of reasons. For most, the series defined their childhoods. That is a very subjective statement. What is objectively great about Dragon Ball is its massive and varied gallery of supporting characters, especially the villains. Arguably the most intriguing of who is Broly, the legendary Super Saiyan.

Fans obsess over Broly- the mysterious and savage warrior of seemingly no principle aside from pure mayhem. For many, he is the favorite character in the series. Established from the first Dragon Ball Z movie of his, Broly is one the last surviving members of Goku and Vegeta’s race, an untamable and monstrous individual of pure power. He is the only Dragon Ball villain to be featured in more than one movie. However, the thing about him is, he is a movie villain only and thus not part of the greater Dragon Ball canon. Toriyama and Co. decided to change that, and the result is marvelous.

Read more: https://hifipublic.com/en/2018/09/17/why-everyone-should-watch-anime/

New and improved: Not even his final form

Dragon Ball Super: Broly brings the titular character into the main universe continuation of the series and thus gives him a brand new origin to suit. It is still as close to the original as it needs to be though. Fans tend to get somewhat touchy about rehashes and revisions of their favorite characters. This movie pulls off the reboot as well as can be.

A large part of what made Broly into such a favorite in the previous continuity was the mystique surrounding him and his violence. There was some explanation to it, but it did not feel satisfactory to me and Broly felt like a really cool but incomplete character. This one does a much better job of portraying Broly as an actual person and his driving forces. Not to worry though, he is still as cool and as buff as ever. He is still out to get everyone unfortunate enough to anger him (mostly Goku). Just now, he has a reason to.

One would expect the movie to follow the character into being a complete revamp, but thankfully it is not so. It does not just ignore the previous incarnation of Broly, the movie is self-aware in the sense that it often throws shade to the past incarnation of Broly and his tale. We found that very rewarding as a long time follower.

About the movie itself

First, we need to talk about the animation quality. Super started with objectively bad animation quality. We have come a long way from there. It was evident in the anime and more so in this movie. Dragon Ball: Super is one of the most gorgeous looking animated movies we have ever seen. The animation is not just beautiful but crisp and consistent. You can notice the amount of effort that went into producing this. Toriyama himself mostly made the character designs, so you can bet on its quality. The signature fighting scenes of Dragon Ball have arguably never been better. Scene transitions are seamless. At no point do you not want to be looking at the screen.

The story is surprisingly rich by Dragon Ball standards.

At least in the movies, Dragon Ball has been mostly about cool fight scenes, of which this has no shortage. However, the importance of story has been paid attention to, evident from the fleshed out origins and motivations at work behind each character. Previously fans have complained about the lack of consistency in the storytelling of Toriyama. In this movie, the story is wonderfully structured and perfectly addresses previous storylines that follow up to the movie.  The redemption arc every Dragon Ball villain seems to have is a bother for many fans. Nevertheless, do not worry. Frieza is still as evil as ever.

Verdict

Dragon Ball Super: Broly is a wonderful film experience for newcomers and longtime fans alike. 9/10 from us easily.

It is a beautiful, emotional and action-packed ride that made the old and cynical partisan in us smile and hope for the future of the story introduced in this film. So, hurry up and go watch it.

Book your tickets from here.