Everything you need to know about Facebook’s cryptocurrency Libra

We’re all familiar with the term cryptocurrency, and perhaps with its nature too. Cryptocurrency itself didn’t work out as well as expected in the long term. But the concept might be put to good use by none other than Facebook.

How did the crypto hype start?

Cryptocurrency at its peak looked nothing more than a “make money quick” scheme or an electricity bill hazard. But the possibilities such a concept could bring about were left unexplored. A form of currency separate from cash or cards promises added convenience and liquidity and would be the kind of thing we see in sci-fi films. Which is probably why Facebook has decided to adopt a form of cryptocurrency.

How does Libra work?

The Libra cryptocurrency, named after the Roman unit of coin measurement is set to launch in the first half of next year. This is certainly the best-supported effort to bring cryptocurrency technology into the mainstream. As the project is backed by 27 prominent companies, the likes of MasterCard, Uber and Spotify chief among them. The currency sets itself apart from other cryptocurrencies like bitcoin by having a group of major currencies like the US Dollar and the British Pound backing it.  This is sure to bring stability to its value. The major reason for the failure of Bitcoin and others in establishing themselves is the fluctuating values they experience in a short time.

Libra promises to facilitate instantaneous money transfers all over the world and fulfilling the potential the cryptocurrency concept originally had. Facebook will also launch a wallet app named Calibra for use in payments over Messenger and WhatsApp.

The Libra promise

Libra has an association of its backers dubbed the Libra association. Each member exercises equal rights over the product, so Facebook doesn’t necessarily own Libra. Different backers have also implied that they will use their expertise to help the cause in different ways. In addition to a strong group of overseers, Libra also has its value regulated by established currencies. Thus, expectations of its success are very valid. Let’s see how it goes.

This week in Tech: What’s happening in Dhaka

You might have noticed, we here at hifi public are quite keen on technology. We try to report the most prominent occurrences in tech on a regular basis. Focusing on some things inevitably leads to not focusing on others, given a person’s limited attention span. Therefore, here we shall try to bring some neat pieces of tech news that deserve your attention.

Disclaimer, not putting Google Stadia here because we’ve already talked about that. Also, that topic requires a larger amount of focus. Without further ado, here’s a list of tech things you should know.
Over 2.6 million SIM cards to be disabled

Over 2.6 million SIM cards to be disabled

You might be losing  your SIM card on April 26th, as over 2.6 million SIMs are to be disabled by the government. This step is being taken as a response to violations of the maximum limit of SIMs that can be registered against a single national ID. While the maximum is 15 SIMs for a single national ID, at least one hundred thousand National IDs are in violation of this rule.

According to reports, the government is going to provide mobile operators with information regarding the SIMs in violation. The operators will in turn reduce registered SIMs to 15 each ID. If you want to find out the number of SIMs registered by your ID, dial *16001# and push the last four digits of your national ID. But chances are it won’t do much good now.

2. Clash over “Haha” reacts on Facebook

Just….yeah.

Two groups of students engaged in chases and hurling stones, among other uber-masculine activities in a clash that had supposedly began over a Facebook react. This took place in Chittagong University, between two Facebook groups based on the university’s  Shuttle train bogeys. The clash began from a woman’s Facebook post receiving a “Haha” react from a student of another group. Reports suggest numerous people were wounded in the clash that began at noon and resumed on a start-stop basis every now and then. The University’s police claim that the situation is now relaxed, while student leaders who were involved blame the occurrence on a misunderstanding.

The world’s probably going to end because of an Instagram post.

3. First storm of the season disrupts Telecommunications and Internet

We had this year’s first big Kalbaisakhi storm last night. While it was soothing for most given the hot weather preceding it, the storm laid countrywide waste to telecommunication services. Network towers were damaged resulting in mobile services being unavailable in many places. In addition, the storm has detached electricity to many operator sites, leading to internet services being down as well. In fact, both broadband and mobile internet services are still down in parts of the country.

According to reports, about 2800 sites of Grameenphone are down as of the morning of 1st April. Robi has lost about 2000 sites, while Banglalink has lost close to 1500. While the services were briefly resumed by way of generators, said generators quickly ran out of fuel. However, operators say that refuelling is taking place.

Pretty impressive for a storm that lasted about a couple of minutes.

That was a brief list of the few things happening in the local tech scenario that deserve your attention. And your reactions. Perhaps not reactions that include laughter.

We’re gonna go fight some people laughing outside the office.

China lands a probe on the far side of the moon, what it implies

A Chinese space probe, Chang’e 4, has become the first ever spacecraft to land on the far side of the moon. The probe touched down at 2:26 am GMT on Thursday. It made its final descent from an elliptical orbit 15 kilometres above the moon’s surface. An image tweeted by CCTV showed the first shot of the far side of the moon.

What is far side of the moon?

The far side of the moon never faces earth, due to the moon’s rotation.

Although sometimes mistakenly referred to as the “dark side of the moon,” it receives just as much sunlight as its Earth-facing side.

The mission aims to explore the Aitken basin, thought to form during a gigantic collision during an early period in the moon’s history. This area is free from radio frequencies and thus lunar rovers cannot contact ground control directly. China launched a dedicated satellite orbiting the moon earlier this year to solve this problem.

Some of the objectives include conducting the first lunar low-frequency radio astronomy experiment, observing whether plants can grow in the low-gravity environment, and exploring the availability of water and other resources at the poles.

The mission also aims to study how solar winds interact with the moon surface.

Chinese space dominance?

A stronger space nation?

“China is on the road to becoming a strong space nation. And this marks one of the milestone events of building a strong space nation,”

Said Wu Weiren, chief designer for the lunar mission.

According to Malcolm Davis, senior analyst in defence strategy and capability at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, the landing might motivate the Americans to step up their space efforts.

“I imagine we will see an announcement the Chinese do intend to send Taikonauts to the moon by 2030. China has been very clear in its understanding of this. They have compared the moon to the South China Sea and Taiwan, and asteroids to the East China Sea. They’re making a very clear geopolitical comparison with what’s happening with space and we need to pay attention to that.

Malcolm Davis

A year in review: 5 things that marked the local tech scenario in 2018

2018 has been an eventful year for Bangladesh. And the biggest milestones are from local tech scenario. Both Government and private projects have achieved outstanding feats this year and have made their marks. As we head into 2019, let us take a look at 5 things that have made the news in 2018.

1. Pathao goes global

In early September, Pathao became the first Bangladeshi ride sharing company to go global by launching services in Nepal. Expansion in Nepal was Pathao’s first step in their plan to expand business further.

2. bKash’s app redefines mobile banking

bKash launched its super simple app in 2018. And mobile banking in Bangladesh has never been easier. With its simple and sleek design and user friendly operation, bkash quickly became the go to name for cashless transactions.

3. Bangladesh goes to space

2018 will forever be remembered as the year Bangladesh went to space. The Government launched its first geostationary satellite, Bangabandhu-1. With the launch of its first ever satellite, Bangladesh became a member of the club of the elite nations who have their mark in space.

4. The year of Pathao’s controversial data stealing

Pathao made the news once again in 2018 after it was revealed that they have been breaching user data. Pathao later issued an explanation and went through some major updates to its app but the controversy was never fully cleared.

5. Shohoz raised $15M investment

A year in review: 5 things that marked the local tech scenario in 2018

Another ride sharing app, Shohoz raised a massive $15M investment this year. With this investment Shohoz plans to become a major competitor in the ride sharing market of the country

Google Pixel 3 Lite: Why bringing back the headphone jack is a good idea

There have been rumors of a possible budget variant of Google’s flagship Pixel smart-phone; it was only recently that we got a glimpse at what it might look like. It has been referred to as the “Pixel 3 Lite”, and it combines the design of the Pixels with a smaller 5.5-inch display and a mid-range Snapdragon 670 processor. Although the usual complaints about the antiquated design and large bezels persist in this phone, one of the issues that a significant portion of consumers have been clamouring for a long time might have finally been addressed. By far the most interesting aspect of this phone is Google’s apparent decision to include a headphone jack for the first time since their very first Pixel phone.

Phones and headphone jacks have complimented each other for the longest time. For most of us, our first feature phones had a 3.5 mm jack, and it was perhaps the most interesting aspect of the phone to each of us at the time—cue countless hours of ripping MP3 files and loading them onto tiny memory cards. With smartphones, the need of a headphone jack was even greater—smartphones aimed at being the convenience guarantor and having a 3.5 mm jack on your smartphone was the convenient way to listen to music or recordings. And while the industry has transformed from feature phones to flip phones to finally smartphones, the headphone jack has largely remained constant. In an industry as focused on innovation as the smartphone industry change is the only constant. Thus we had to part ways with our headphone jacks, while Bluetooth and USB-C ports look to be the future. However, is that a good thing?

Firstly, the reason the headphone jack stuck around for so long is that it worked. It was a solved problem; there wasn’t much reason to move forward. Yes, we always strive for quicker and more convenient ways to solve a problem; provided the problem is still solved with the amount of quality retained. And the bottom line is, Bluetooth just doesn’t do that. Bluetooth audio quality is nowhere near the quality offered by most cabled equipment, yet. They simply can’t play high bit-rate files, or at least at the same quality wired equipment can. However, it is convenience vs. quality here, with different people obviously valuing different things. Audiophiles will always value cabled equipment, while consumers who value the convenience and portability of Bluetooth will opt for it. But the thing is, it isn’t too much to ask for both options on a device, especially when the manufacturing cost is so small.

It isn’t fair to say Bluetooth is bad for listening to music. High-end Bluetooth equipment can dish out music that is only perceptively worse than wired equipment. But to achieve that quality with Bluetooth, one has to spend a lot more than one had to for a wired option of similar quality. There is essentially no way to listen to a raw, loss-less sound on Bluetooth earphones; they just aren’t capable of it yet. All sounds need to be encoded to the Bluetooth headset, then decoded back to play. This is essentially the same tech as it was in 2004 when the first stereo Bluetooth headset came out. So Bluetooth still has a long way to go to match the 3.5 mm jack in performance.

Bluetooth headphones, ironically, offer less diversity than wired headphones. Active noise cancelling, bass-heavy, treble-heavy, you name it. There are headphones offered specifically to gamers, joggers, for Skype calls, etc. There’s a ton of flexibility when it comes to wired headphones, mainly because they’ve been around for longer and have had the time to address each specific need in the market. Bluetooth simply doesn’t offer that kind of flexibility yet. Bluetooth is mostly aimed at an active lifestyle, being more portable. They tend to have minimal builds, make complete seals with ear cups for better noise cancellation, and mostly just need you to adapt to it rather than it adapting to you. That doesn’t work for a lot of people and as it has been said before, there is simply no reason not to have both wired and Bluetooth options.

The weight then falls onto the USB-C type ports and dongles to make the argument for no headphone jacks. And I’m just going to say this flat out—dongles are bad. A lot of DACs and amps simply don’t work with the USB-C tech, and using one port to both charge your phone and listen to music causes an unnecessary amount of wear and tear. It is also a sloppy thing to use, as it’s easy to lose and just adds a new point of failure, being an external accessory.

On the point of convenience, Bluetooth doesn’t necessarily become the convenience provider most distributors make it out to be. Having a Bluetooth device means having another device to charge. At the same time when smartphone companies are trying to offer quicker ways to charge your phone to maximize time utilization—like fast chargers and larger batteries—doesn’t having another device to charge actually feel less convenient (if not completely defeating the purpose)? Bluetooth might indeed be the future, as it can only be improved upon. The problem is it hasn’t been fixed yet. There was never anything added to the experience of owning a device without a headphone jack, options were only taken away from it. For this reason, the headphone jack coming back in a market leader’s next big device is a welcome change. I personally feel like this is a good decision by Google, and eagerly await the return of the 3.5 mm jack in all its glory.

Shohoz plans to go big with $15M investment. Can it keep up?

Shohoz rides, the latest addition in the ride-sharing industry of the country, has pulled in $15M worth of investments as a part of its round B investments. Singapore based Golden Gate Ventures led the new investments round. Linear VC of China, 500 Startups and Singapore based angel investor Koh Boon Hwee were also associated with this investment.

With this investment, Shohoz rides becomes one of the heavily invested in businesses in the country and looks steadily set in their goal of expanding their services in the future. Shohoz’s closest rival, Pathao, has also recently raised $10M investment from Indonesian ride sharing giant, Go-Jek.

Steady growth

Shohoz raises $15M
Shohoz started with online bus ticketing

Shohoz has remained a trusted name in online sales for bus tickets since 2014. After its initial success, it soon expanded to selling ferry tickets and very recently, tickets for events and movies. After the ride-sharing industry in the country saw a boom in the latter half of last year, Shohoz started out its ride-sharing services, Shohoz rides, this year in January.

With its ride-sharing services rapidly gaining traction, it does not, however, mean that the platform will move away from its bus ticketing services. “Bus tickets will remain an important part of our business, [there’s] lots of synergy with ride-sharing,” she explained in an interview with Techcrunch. “Dhaka has a super dense population with bad infrastructure. If anything, there’s a better case for ride-sharing than Indonesia. There’s no subway and transport is a horrid nightmare.”

Shohoz started its ride-sharing services by adding motorbikes to its platform. It recently added cars to it and hopes their overall service will ease the traffic situation in the capital city.

Keeping its feet on the ground

Shohoz raises $15M

Despite having shown promising prospects, Shohoz has apparently been taking things slow. It hasn’t yet shown any initiative to grab iOS users in the country but recently underwent a massive rebranding to appeal to new customers. It is unclear if they’re planning to launch an iOS app any soon.

Shohoz plans to tap into the groceries and food delivery market soon. It aims to model itself after the “Super App” style most southeast Asian tech giants usually go for and something Pathao has recently ventured into.

It doesn’t plan to go global anytime soon but is surely set to expand its services outside the capital city of Dhaka, as explained by the CEO in a recent interview.

Is three a crowd?

Shohoz raises $15M

Currently, three ride-sharing platforms, including Shohoz, are doing steady business in Bangladesh.

Pathao has skyrocketed with its constant influx of investment, aggressive market attitude and expansion beyond the country. Uber, although lagging a bit behind in the local market in comparison with Pathao, is on stable grounds. With its UberEats service soon launching in Bangladesh, its competition with Pathao is not dying down any soon either.

Can Shohoz keep up with aggressive Pathao and international giant Uber with its laid back but organised market strategies? So far, they’ve been doing good for themselves. Only time will tell what the future holds for this ride-sharing rising star.

Three iPhones and a watch: everything you need to know about Apple’s Sept 12 event

It looks like the rumours were right on the money.

On Wednesday, Apple announced three new iPhones– all successors to last year’s opinion dividing smash hit, the iPhone X. It also announced a new Apple Watch and a new iOS.

Apple is about to ship their two billionth iOS device this year. This sounds like a good time to double down on success and spread the goodness around.

Large displays get even larger

The new flagships, Apple XS and XS Max are faster, sleeker, and most importantly, larger than the iPhone X. The iPhone XS retains the 5.8-inch dimensions from last year, while the XS Max upgrades to a massive 6.5-inches, with a 2,688 x 1,242 resolution. These display panels are made of the strongest smartphone glass ever made, according to Phil Schiller.

New iPhones get bigger screens

The XS Max is also larger than even the newest Note 9, which has a 6.4-inch screen.

Not only is the XS Max larger than any iPhone before, it also feels better than any previous Plus model.

Both XS models boast better stereo speakers, faster Face ID and better water resistance. The newly announced A12 Bionic processor also gives the models a significant boost in speed, leading to an average increased efficiency of 45% among all cores. The A12 is a six-core chip, an industry-first chip to use a 7nm production process. The XS models will also support dual SIMs, which will be a massive boon to Asian markets. It will be available later in the fall, via a software upgrade.

Both the front and rear cameras got a nice boost. Like last year, the rear cameras are both 12-megapixels; but the new the wide-angle sensor creates a noticeable difference. Optical image stabilization has been added, and the True Tone sensor has been upgraded as well. The telephoto also includes a wider aperture, for better low light photography. Although the front camera is still at 7-megapixels, it’s gotten faster as well.

One big software upgrade Apple is introducing for its camera is the Smart HDR feature. Similar to the Pixel, iPhones will now take multiple images and splice them together to get the best shot.

The battery gets a modest upgrade: the XS has 30 more minutes of battery life, while the XS Max gets an hour and a half more.

The XS starts at $999, while the XS Max starts at $1,099.

The new affordable iPhone

iPhone XR the new default iPhone

The iPhone XR will be the default smartphone for many buyers this fall. It’s budget-friendly and sacrifices the dual cameras and OLED screens of its larger siblings, but it also provides newer features over last year’s iPhone 8.

The 6.1-inch screen is an LCD Display, dubbed ‘Liquid Retina’, reportedly the most advanced LCD smartphone display yet, with a 1,792 x 828 resolution. Specs-wise, the XR matches many of the XS’ upgrades – which include the A12 bionic processor and dual SIM feature – but it lacks 3D touch. The single 12-megapixel camera is still capable of taking portrait-style photos with blurred bokeh effects.

The iPhone XR starts off at $749. It’s a much more affordable alternative to the X and the XS models. However, if you are looking for dual cameras, you are better off with the XS, or even an iPhone 8 Plus instead.

The watch gets bigger, too

Apple unveiled the Apple Watch Series 4  earlier at the event, with a newly revamped, larger screen that goes nearly edge to edge. It now comes in two sizes: 40 mm and 44 mm. Sporting a new dual-core 64-bit S4 processor, the new Apple Watch is twice as fast compared to Series 3 models. Other hardware improvements include a better accelerometer and gyroscope.

Bigger Applel watches

The Watch’s most notable new feature is the ability to take an electrocardiogram (EKG).

This makes this the first consumer product to do EKGs that are sold over the counter. The Series 4 model has already been approved by the FDA for use as a medical device.

The WatchOS’ UI has also been redesigned and tweaked to take advantage of the larger display. The watch face has also been overhauled, with eight new combinations. Other additions include haptic feedback and a ring-shaped LTE red dot indicator. The battery life remains unchanged at 18 hours, although the speakers have gotten a little louder.

The GPS only version will ship at $399, while the GPS + LTE version will ship at $499. They are a safe bet on Apple’s part, who overtook Xiaomi and Fitbit in Q2 2017 as the largest seller of wearables.

So many Apple devices, so little cash

Last year, there was some scepticism that the iPhone X’s $999 price tag would limit its appeal. However, Apple revealed in its last earnings that the X has proven consistently more popular than both the iPhone 7 and 8. It also outsold most rival flagships, including the Note 8 and the Pixel 2.

Apple special event

There’s little reason at this point to upgrade to an XR or an XS from an X this year, but that has never stopped Apple loyalists before. Feel free to spend away, and make the poorer folk weep at your misfortunes. If you are poor, worry not: the iPhone 7 and 8 are now available at $449 and $549 respectively.

The iPhones XS, XS Max and XR will be available in October, while the Apple Watch Series 4 will be available in late September.

Does Tesla and Elon Musk need an intervention?

As awesome as Tony Stark is, sometimes he needs friends to help him get through the day. That can include fighting aliens and rogue AIs or helping him recover from alcoholism and get his company back to speed. Perhaps, it’s time for Elon Musk to get the same kind of help, too.

Tesla’s shares slid by more than six percent on Friday, after Musk smoked weed during a live interview with Joe Rogan. This is the kind of behavior that, while not entirely unexpected from a man who launched a car into space, is also rarely seen from CEOs who run companies worth 45 billion dollars.

A Series of Unfortunate Events

2018 hasn’t been easy, for both Musk and Tesla. It has consistently missed production targets for the Model 3. Musk has amped up production since last year, a process that he has termed “production hell”. In a radical move, he attempted to automate most of the production line. One such production robot, affectionately dubbed the “fluffer bot”, was so ineffective that it repeatedly stalled production. He eventually had to replace it by human workers.

Then came the Thailand rescue saga, where Musk accused a diver of being a pedophile. He doubled down on these accusations in August, wondering why the diver, Vernon Unsworth, didn’t feel confident enough to sue Musk. Unsworth happily obliged.

Last month also saw Musk teasing about taking Tesla private. NYSE shorts Tesla among one of the most commonly shorted stocks. And Musk has often accused Tesla short sellers of actively trying to sabotage Tesla. However, he changed his mind after apparently securing funding from a Saudi Arabian fund. The SEC is also investigating Tesla for Musk’s initial “funding secured” tweet.

Should Musk Head Towards Greener Pastures?

elon musk tesla

Musk admitted, in a tearful interview for the New York Times, that 2018 has been the most stressful year of his life so far. He constantly uses Ambien and is open to hiring another executive at Tesla to help him tide over the constant challenges. Earlier, Azalea Banks also alleged on Instagram that she was in Musk’s house while he tweeted about taking Tesla private when he was on acid.

Musk’s latest stunt triggered two exits. His chief accounting officer, Dave Morton, is leaving Tesla after just a month on the job. Apparently, his expectations about the pressure and environment have been thoroughly exceeded, especially given the level of public attention being placed on the company. He and HR chief Gaby Toledano join a list of thirty executives who have departed Tesla since 2016.

Musk reshuffled his executive deck by announcing a series of promotions through a company-wide email. It should be noted that these were not new hires, and thus long planned before the resignations on Friday.

Musk’s antics put the investors in a tough spot. Tesla’s stocks are down by fifteen percent so far; compared to the all-time high last year, it’s a further degradation of thirty percent. There’s much to rejoice for within Tesla, with the SolarCity acquisition and plans for semi-trucks targeted towards corporate buyers. In fact, Tesla is forecasted to turn a profit for this year’s fourth quarter and expected to hold speed for the entirety of FY 2019-20.

However, now investors can’t help but wonder if Musk doesn’t just need another hand as a COO, but if he should step down as CEO entirely. Possible alternatives for Musk include ex-Ford CEO, Alan Mullaly.

SpaceX, for instance, is faring much better than Tesla, where Musk has a well-regarded CEO in Glynne Shotwell. Shotwell has been at the company since 2002 and was made COO in 2008.

Are Musk and Tesla Inseparable?

elon musk tesla

In Tesla, Musk’s influence is much more singular than in SpaceX. He constantly spends time with engineering problems. During a routine factory tour, Musk was visibly annoyed when the assembly line stopped moving. Although it was a standard safety precaution, he stated that wished the cars to keep moving anyways and didn’t see how the process could hurt him, head-butting a car to demonstrate his confidence.

It is, indeed, true that people are out to get Tesla. Andrew Left, an activist short seller, is suing Tesla and Chairman Elon Musk for actively inflating the company’s stock price. “In response to Musk’s tweets,” Left said in his official complaint, “many Tesla short-sellers were forced to cover their positions at artificially high prices, losing approximately $1.3 billion in a single day.”

It’s tempting to compare Musk to both Steve Jobs and Howard Hughes when it comes to brilliance, charisma and a bluster that may signal his eventual downfall. “People are always telling him he can’t do it,” explained Christopher Davenport, the author of Space Barons: Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and the Quest to Colonize the Cosmos. “But he doesn’t like to hear it can’t be done. He categorically rejects that. It’s all about, ‘How can we do it?’”

“Starting a space company from scratch is simply not done. People warned him against it time and time again, and Elon’s friends even staged an intervention. But he had a commitment to his ideas and a passion and a vision and belief that he saw an opening there — a real business opportunity where, from a technology standpoint, there hadn’t been a lot of advancement.”

“The reason Elon seems to attract drama is that he is so transparent, so open, in a way that can come back to bite him,” said Kimbal Musk, Mr. Musk’s younger brother, to New York Times. “He doesn’t know how to do it differently. It’s just who he is.”

Why Musk Prefers Sleeping on Floors over Cursed Vacations

Elon Musk tesla

The problem with Musk, perhaps, is that he is too confident and firm in his belief in himself. He leads from the front, like the engineering version of Alexander the Great. Often found sleeping on factory floors or under his office desk. “A C.E.O.’s most important job is to build a great team around you,” said Bill George, a Goldman Sachs board member. “He shouldn’t be sleeping on the factory floor. I’d rather have him sleeping at home.”

Musk’s legendary work schedule is well known. He works one hundred and twenty hours a week, dividing his time between SpaceX and Tesla. He nearly missed his brother’s wedding in Spain this summer. “I got there two hours before the ceremony,” he said. “I left directly from the factory. And then I went straight back.”

As committed as Musk is, he is only human. We need humans like Musk, now more than ever. In a world where the youngest billionaires run the gamut from Mark Zuckerberg to Kylie Jenner, Musk is working on genuine problems to create solutions that benefit society, and civilization, at large.

“Launching a business is hard, particularly when you have a vision to change the world like Tesla,” wrote Amy Nelson, founder, and CEO of The Riveter, which creates work and community spaces. “I applaud Musk for his authenticity and I believe it is important for founders to share with one another and the world what starting a company is like…Musk, I hear you. This is really wonderful and really hard. You’ve got a few more years of running a company under your belt, but trust me: I feel your pain.”

Musk hasn’t taken a vacation since 2001. Vacations are cursed, he thinks. You can’t blame him. In 2000, he was ousted from Paypal by the board and replaced by Peter Thiel. Later, he contracted malaria in Brazil and almost died. However, for his own sake, and for ours as well, perhaps Musk should try taking more time off than he usually does.
The truth is, we can all try staging an intervention to bring Musk down to Earth. But interventions haven’t worked for Musk in the past, and they probably won’t work now, either.