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Software Engineer, Michael Peres, battled ADHD to success

A software engineer and successful entrepreneur are defying the struggles of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) by doing the things he loves and earning from it.

Twenty-nine-year-old Michael Peres, also a mathematician and travel entrepreneur, is looking at ADHD as an asset rather than a liability.

Peres was able to transform his hyperactivity disorder into an energy source that fuels his mind and body to create successful businesses – the Hecto Fox and Hexa Tiger, web hosting and web development companies that are getting popular at present, now reaching over 400 clienteles in just a span of 3 years.

Peres was diagnosed with ADHD and other learning disorders at 9 years old. His mother was so concerned with his condition that she made sure he consistently take his prescribed medication Ritalin, an extended-release stimulant. 

ADHD can be a serious condition that when left untreated, can lead to frustrations and further psychological problems throughout a person’s life.

Although Peres’ complains about the side effects of the drug, the times when Ritalin works made him unstoppable. These are the times when his creative ideas come out, providing him with an avenue to channel the negative energies of ADHD into something worthwhile. 

As a child, Peres suffered the stigma of ADHD. He was always labelled as having learning disabilities. He needed to have a separate learning environment as secular education was difficult for his condition. Socially, he could not also relate with peers so he devised ways in order to accommodate his needs. 

Peres found his passion for computers. Because he could not connect with other peers, he would lock himself in a room, learning about technology. His knowledge about computers also helped him earn at a young age as his high school and the community where he lived would ask for him to solve their computer problems.

Peres, who hails from a Jewish community in Montreal, Quebec Canada, completed his bachelor degree in Computer Science in the same city. 

He had challenges while in college, but with a positive mindset, he engineered solutions to address the difficulty of learning in a regular class by going to the library and educating himself. He would only come to class during exams, which proved effective as he was able to complete courses related to Calculus, Linear Algebra, Physics, and Java Programming. Later, he finished a degree in Mathematics from Yeshiva University in New York City doing the same technique.

According to Peres, it is up to the person with ADHD to learn to deal with the disability and make the challenging situation into a manageable one, engineering solutions to fit one’s dreams or ambition.

Today, Peres made a vow to help other people with a similar condition as his. He created a program called Breaking 9 to 5, Breaking 9 to 5, which introduces a 10 step program designed to help entrepreneurs like him to watch over their businesses while enjoying the benefits of travelling.

Harmony OS: Huawei’s response to Android

In its annual developer conference, Huawei finally unveiled its long-awaited operating system, HarmonyOS, that was secretly under development for years. This new operating system is said to be much faster and smoother than its rival, Android.

In the wake of the recent US trade ban on China, and the subsequent suspension of Huawei’s license by Google, the Chinese company was forced to think of a “Plan B”. Although Huawei had been building the operating system in secrecy to bind their devices into one unified “ecosystem”, the development of the OS only escalated after Huawei temporarily lost the rights to use Google’s Android.

Harmony OS: Huawei’s response to Android

HarmonyOS is built with the concept of “connectivity” and “compatibility” where every device is connected within an ecosystem. To achieve such a level of compatibility, it was necessary to build an operating system that would provide room for developers to build apps and port them for different types of devices without rebuilding them from scratch. Here are a few important highlights from Huawei’s presentation.

Read more: Huawei: Enemy of the US?

Internet of Things

Harmony OS: Huawei’s response to Android

HarmonyOS features microkernel, same as Google Fuchsia OS, but only does it better than Google in terms of current progress. The first device to use HarmonyOS is Honor Vision TV that was launched on August 10, indicating Huawei’s attempt to decrease its reliance on Google’s Android.

In China, HarmonyOS will be called HongMeng OS and will gradually show up in various smart devices by 2020.

According to Huawei’s senior vice president Catherine Chen, HarmonyOS is an embedded operating system designed for Internet of things (IoT) hardware.

That means the primary goal of this operating system is to allow extension of Internet connectivity into physical devices and everyday objects. 

As part of the IoT program, HarmonyOS will be compatible with Smartphones as well. Richard Yu, the company’s Consumer Business Group CEO states that it can migrate to HarmonyOS from Android at any time due to the nature & flexibility of the microkernel. However, the Chinese company decided to stick to Android for now owing to its commitments to Google.

Read more: Samsung Galaxy Note 10+ arrives in Bangladesh

Security & Android apps compatibility

In future, HarmonyOS will support Android apps. For that, developers will need to use Huawei made IDE that supports C/C++, Java, and Kotlin to convert android apps and make them compatible for HarmonyOS. It is seemingly an easier process due to the flexibility offered by the new OS. Interestingly, HarmonyOS won’t support root access because of security risks.

Harmony OS will be available in smartphones, smart speakers, computers, smartwatches, wireless earbuds, cars, and tablets. The developers can create one version of their apps and then use them across a range of different devices.

Harmony OS: Huawei’s response to Android

“We needed an OS that supports all scenarios, that can be used across a broad range of devices and platforms, and that can meet consumer demand for low latency and strong security,”

Unlike Android that uses Linux’s kernel, Harmony OS uses a “deterministic latency engine” that improves latency and latency fluctuation by 25.7% and 55.6 respectively. Moreover, Huawei claims that the microkernel can make “IPC [Inter Process Communication] performance up to five times more efficient than existing systems.”

Open-source

Huawei will be open-sourcing the HarmonyOS which means that the source code of the operating system will be available to the developers for further manipulation and anybody can use it to create compatible devices. The version 2.0 of HarmonyOS will be released in the next year and version 3.0 will be available by 2021. 

Harmony OS: Huawei’s response to Android

Huawei claims that Harmony is an entirely different operating system than Android or iOS. That is because it enables AI capability in different forms from computers, tablets and other domains. For now, Huawei aims at focusing on the development of Harmony OS only in China. However, with future plans to expand globally.

Can it replace Android?

Harmony OS: Huawei’s response to Android

The biggest hurdle in outcompeting an existing successful operating system is to convince the developers to start building for the new platform. Over the years, Microsoft, Samsung, Blackberry, Firefox, Jolla failed to persuade the developers to make apps for Windows Phone, TizenOS, FirefoxOS, SailfishOS respectively.

No matter how feature-rich or faster the operating system is, without the proper support from the developer’s community, a new operating system can’t displace Android. This is exactly the reason why Huawei still chooses to stick to Google’s Android and keeps HarmonyOS as their plan B for smartphones. But, the Chinese smartphone giant vows to continue developing the OS and make it available in various smart devices in the near future.

Read more: Google Maps adds new features for Bangladeshi roads including a biker mode, safety feature and more

Sony is launching an AC that you can wear. No kidding.

Wearable technology has developed tremendously over the years. There have been a few stumbles on the way, but now apple watch is in its 4th iteration and there is no shortage of android smartwatches in the market. That being said, there is an obvious lack of innovation when it comes to wearable technologies in the public market.

The future is here

Well, Sony has taken a look at everything and decided that it is time to do something new and special.

They have developed what they are calling the ‘Reon Pocket’.

It is supposed to be a portable, wearable Bluetooth enabled air conditioner that fits into your pocket. That’s right, it’s a pocket AC and it’s no science fiction.

How it works

The ‘Reon Pocket’ works in conjunction with a special undershirt. Once the device is set up, you can control your body temperature using an app on your android or apple device. Thermoelectric coping is used to make sure that the user does not feel too hot or too cold. The device can increase your body temperature by fourteen degrees, or cool it down by twenty-three degrees. It’s up to you and the weather to decide what you want.

The product is not commercially available as of yet. Sony has launched a crowdfunding campaign to start off the development of the project. The campaign has already reached forty-three per cent of its stated goal and if all goes well, we may see the device start its development phase by the next summer.

A portable air conditioner would be a truly convenient tool. Here is to hoping that the project is a success and we can be a little more comfortable when we are stuck in Dhaka traffic during the hot summer.