fbpx

Huawei wins New Product Innovation Leadership Award

Huawei’s NetEngine 8000 Series routers received the “Global Service Router New Product Innovation Leadership Award” from Frost & Sullivan, a renowned consulting firm, at the Excellence in Best Practices Awards Gala. The NetEngine 8000 series is the industry’s first router that provides a capacity of 14.4T per slot, which is 1.5 times the industry average.

This award recognizes Huawei’s contributions to product innovation in the newly launched NetEngine 8000 series routers, which provide an all-scenario unified platform that features SRv6-powered intelligent connections, and AI-boosted intelligent operations and maintenance (O&M). 

The IP bearer network is the foundation of various digital services such as mobile, home, and private line in the 5G and cloud era. Nevertheless, the IP bearer network faces many challenges in terms of large capacity, multi-network convergence, service-level agreement (SLA) assurance, and efficient O&M.  But NetEngine 8000 series applies to the metro core, aggregation, DC gateway, and international gateway scenarios. The 4-in-1 platform for all scenarios greatly simplifies network node deployment and complexity. All NetEngine 8000 series routers support network slicing, multi-service bearing, and one network for multiple purposes.

SRv6 enables automated connections across domains, service provisioning within minutes, and one-hop access to the cloud. 

Huawei launched the industry’s first intelligent metro router for 5G at the MPLS+SDN+NFV World Congress 2019 in Paris in April 2019 to meet what is expected to be a huge demand for 5G ready solutions. According to research from GSMA, by 2025 there will be 1.3 billion 5G users and 1.36 billion 5G mobile devices worldwide, with 40% 5G network coverage. Gartner forecasts that the number of global IoT connections will reach 2.5 billion by 2021.

According to Frost & Sullivan, ubiquitous services in the 5G and cloud era bring uncertainty to metro network traffic and direction. Vendors need to continuously innovate to help operators provide new services in a faster and more reliable manner. After analyzing the advantages of Huawei’s NetEngine 8000 series in technologies and products, research and development (R&D) capabilities, industry leadership, as well as brand influence, Frost & Sullivan determined that the series consists of outstanding intelligent metro routers.

Hank Chen, President of Huawei’s Service Router Domain, commented, “Huawei has engaged in router R&D since 1995. After more than two decades of continuous investment, Huawei established itself as a leading intelligent IP network provider. The NetEngine 8000 series large-capacity new platform continues to lead in the service router field. Huawei actively promotes the implementation of SRv6 standards at Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and cooperates with operators to accelerate the development of the industry and commercial use of SRv6. Huawei also explores new O&M fields to help improve operators’ intelligent and automated proactive O&M capabilities.”

The Frost & Sullivan Best Practices Award is designed to recognize companies that demonstrate outstanding achievements or display remarkable performance in leadership, technical innovation, customer service, and strategic product R&D in the global or domain market. Senior analysts compare and evaluate vendors through in-depth interviews, analysis, and research to determine the industry’s best practice award winners. The NetEngine 8000 series won the award in the service router field, indicating that the industry authority recognizes its leadership.

Harmony OS: Huawei’s response to Android

In its annual developer conference, Huawei finally unveiled its long-awaited operating system, HarmonyOS, that was secretly under development for years. This new operating system is said to be much faster and smoother than its rival, Android.

In the wake of the recent US trade ban on China, and the subsequent suspension of Huawei’s license by Google, the Chinese company was forced to think of a “Plan B”. Although Huawei had been building the operating system in secrecy to bind their devices into one unified “ecosystem”, the development of the OS only escalated after Huawei temporarily lost the rights to use Google’s Android.

Harmony OS: Huawei’s response to Android

HarmonyOS is built with the concept of “connectivity” and “compatibility” where every device is connected within an ecosystem. To achieve such a level of compatibility, it was necessary to build an operating system that would provide room for developers to build apps and port them for different types of devices without rebuilding them from scratch. Here are a few important highlights from Huawei’s presentation.

Read more: Huawei: Enemy of the US?

Internet of Things

Harmony OS: Huawei’s response to Android

HarmonyOS features microkernel, same as Google Fuchsia OS, but only does it better than Google in terms of current progress. The first device to use HarmonyOS is Honor Vision TV that was launched on August 10, indicating Huawei’s attempt to decrease its reliance on Google’s Android.

In China, HarmonyOS will be called HongMeng OS and will gradually show up in various smart devices by 2020.

According to Huawei’s senior vice president Catherine Chen, HarmonyOS is an embedded operating system designed for Internet of things (IoT) hardware.

That means the primary goal of this operating system is to allow extension of Internet connectivity into physical devices and everyday objects. 

As part of the IoT program, HarmonyOS will be compatible with Smartphones as well. Richard Yu, the company’s Consumer Business Group CEO states that it can migrate to HarmonyOS from Android at any time due to the nature & flexibility of the microkernel. However, the Chinese company decided to stick to Android for now owing to its commitments to Google.

Read more: Samsung Galaxy Note 10+ arrives in Bangladesh

Security & Android apps compatibility

In future, HarmonyOS will support Android apps. For that, developers will need to use Huawei made IDE that supports C/C++, Java, and Kotlin to convert android apps and make them compatible for HarmonyOS. It is seemingly an easier process due to the flexibility offered by the new OS. Interestingly, HarmonyOS won’t support root access because of security risks.

Harmony OS will be available in smartphones, smart speakers, computers, smartwatches, wireless earbuds, cars, and tablets. The developers can create one version of their apps and then use them across a range of different devices.

Harmony OS: Huawei’s response to Android

“We needed an OS that supports all scenarios, that can be used across a broad range of devices and platforms, and that can meet consumer demand for low latency and strong security,”

Unlike Android that uses Linux’s kernel, Harmony OS uses a “deterministic latency engine” that improves latency and latency fluctuation by 25.7% and 55.6 respectively. Moreover, Huawei claims that the microkernel can make “IPC [Inter Process Communication] performance up to five times more efficient than existing systems.”

Open-source

Huawei will be open-sourcing the HarmonyOS which means that the source code of the operating system will be available to the developers for further manipulation and anybody can use it to create compatible devices. The version 2.0 of HarmonyOS will be released in the next year and version 3.0 will be available by 2021. 

Harmony OS: Huawei’s response to Android

Huawei claims that Harmony is an entirely different operating system than Android or iOS. That is because it enables AI capability in different forms from computers, tablets and other domains. For now, Huawei aims at focusing on the development of Harmony OS only in China. However, with future plans to expand globally.

Can it replace Android?

Harmony OS: Huawei’s response to Android

The biggest hurdle in outcompeting an existing successful operating system is to convince the developers to start building for the new platform. Over the years, Microsoft, Samsung, Blackberry, Firefox, Jolla failed to persuade the developers to make apps for Windows Phone, TizenOS, FirefoxOS, SailfishOS respectively.

No matter how feature-rich or faster the operating system is, without the proper support from the developer’s community, a new operating system can’t displace Android. This is exactly the reason why Huawei still chooses to stick to Google’s Android and keeps HarmonyOS as their plan B for smartphones. But, the Chinese smartphone giant vows to continue developing the OS and make it available in various smart devices in the near future.

Read more: Google Maps adds new features for Bangladeshi roads including a biker mode, safety feature and more