Abandoned WWII airbase to turn into Bangladesh’s first Aeronautical and Aviation University

With help from voice-voters in Parliament, a bill was proposed on February 19th titled, ‘Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Aviation and Aerospace University Bill, 2019’. The bill passed successfully on February 25th. So, the first Aeronautical and Aviation University is now located at an airport in Lalmonirhart that has been abandoned since World War II! A fitting homage!

There will be an aircraft manufacturing factory. According to the Minister of Social Welfare, Nuruzzaman Ahmed, the Government may also establish an aircraft and maintenance repair factory. Traders in Lalomonirhat believe that reusing the abandoned airport will contribute to the academic and economic development of the country.

Source: Daily Star

The university will have both undergraduate and postgraduate levels for their students. He further noted, “Initially, the university plans to have seven faculties, four departments, four institutes.”

Furthermore, the Vice-Chancellor of the University will be a member of the Air Force. As per constitutional law, Bangladesh Air Force Academy, Flying Instructor School, Flight Safety Institute Command and Staff Training Institute, Aeronautical Institute and Officers Training Institute will all be affiliated with the university.

Top Business Competitions in Bangladesh and everything you need to know

If you are a university student in Bangladesh, Business Competitions are not new terms to you. There’s a chance you know about most of them, there’s a higher chance you might have participated in a few of them. Why you should take part in one, is a discussion for another time. But for now, here’s everything you need to know about the most prestigious competitions in Bangladesh and how you need to prepare for them.

1.Battle of Minds by BAT

Battle of Minds, organised by British American Tobacco is one of the most prestigious and most rewarding business competitions in the country. Every year BAT holds Battle of Minds where university students who are in their final years get to participate for the highest glory. You face off the bests of the bests in the field and upon winning, you get a head start towards a rewarding career path.

Rounds: 4 (Online Exam-Focus Group Discussion-Business Pitch-Case Solving)

Team Members: 4

Awards: A Crest and a headstart in the recruitment process.

2. Bizmaestros by Unilever

Similar to BOM, Bizmaestros is arranged every year by another one of the corporate giants, Unilever. It has challenges and rewards similar to BOM and the competitions themselves are often competitors to each other. However, winning Bizmaestros also lands you a trip abroad to Unilever Future Leaders League, where you compete against international teams.

Rounds: 3 (Online Submission-Practical Marketing-Practical Marketing)

Team Members: 3

Awards: Certification along with a trip to Unilever Future Leaders League.

3. Telenor Youth Summit

The last one in the trio of Corporate giant competitions is the Telenor Youth Summit. Unlike previous ones, TYS accepts individual submissions. And as you can guess, the challenge is tougher, obviously. Subsequently, the reward is also higher. A trip to Norway sounds magical, doesn’t it?

Rounds: 3 (Idea Submission-Screening Round-Final Presentation)

Team Members: Individual submission

Awards: Trip to Norway.

4. Brandwitz by IBACC

Brandwitz is one of the most prominent students run business competitions in the country on University level. Organised by IBACC (IBA Communications Club), every year, Brandwitz sees the best minds of the country battling each other for a prize money of BDT 2,50,000. But the money is a minor factor here. You’ll be benefited most from the experience, the certification and the networking that you make.

Rounds: 4 (Case Solving-Product Branding-Practical Marketing-Idea Branding)

Team Members: 4

Awards: BDT 2,50,000.

5. CreAdive by BUP BCC

Creadive is another of the students run business competitions in the country organised by BUP BCC. The competition offers a unique approach to its rounds where it engages participants in direct ATL and BTL campaigns, requiring them to actually take part in fieldwork. The experience is certainly one of a kind.

Rounds: 4 (Case Solving, ATL Campaign, BTL Campaign, Product Branding)

Team Members: 4

Awards: BDT 3,00,000.

5 things you should know before chasing the ‘University Life’

From middle school till high school we get to hear one common phrase from our elders. “Study now, in order to ‘chill’ when you head for University”.

The idea of becoming ‘free’ from multiple disciplinary academics is such a fantasy to all ‘to-be’ freshmen that they believe the prank that society plays on them. Most of us have faced the harsh reality, and have our ways of coping with it. But for those who haven’t applied for University or will be heading for it, here are the things you should know before you dwell into a journey of ‘adulthood’.

1. The Battle to get into a Public University

Right after you finish A levels or HSC, comes the most difficult competition of it all. It often leads to a nationwide swirl every year over the opportunity to get admitted to a public university. While it is an amazing opportunity that you earn for yourself, it is also important to realize that not getting into one, does not necessarily mean that you do not have it in you to be a smart student.

Public universities are not golden gooses and it certainly isn’t the end of the road.

Read more: Where the real pride of Dhaka University lies

There are multiple Universities all across the country which offers you a certificate and scholarships you deserve. So, try not to break down, because you need to save up some energy to deal with quite a lot of adult problems ahead.

2. Choose your major wisely

By now, you should know what you love to do, and even if you don’t, that is also okay. However, try to choose a major or a department you want to genuinely study in and want to enjoy learning.

Read more: Choosing the right foreign university

If you want to study engineering, good on you. But if you want to be a writer or an anthropologist and you end up taking Computer Science and Engineering because you are too afraid of what your relatives might say of you, do understand this, none of them will help you out at 3 am in the morning to finish your assignment which will be due in the next six hours. You deserve the best in the world and you have to learn to fight for it.

3. You need to be present

Whether it is an orientation or a discussion which helps you with understanding the curriculum of your University or your department in details, you need to be there. Once you do get acquainted with everything, right after your classes start, it might be tempting to miss classes since you have been such a goody two shoes all your school life.

You might think you ‘owe it to yourself’ but understand your priority first, then the luxury, my friend. Regular attendance in your classes will not only help you keep in track with quizzes and lectures but you might also be a friendly face to your professor which will help you in the long run. The idea of getting a good grade in your courses is to be present, no matter what!

4. There is nothing called ‘chill time’ in your prime time

Sadly, the idea of having the most independent and free time when you are studying in a University is a lie that parents feed us so that we study more when it is easy to control us.

Of course, when you are in a University, you get to meet new people, hang out more, take time for finding your passion for something you were always interested in such as a part-time job, travel with your friends etc.

Read more: Struggles of an English major in Bangladesh

But it all becomes difficult to handle when you try to adjust all this while you are trying to graduate. This leads up to late night study hours, overeating, anxiety and that is where you really need to unleash the energy we told you to hold onto.

It might be tricky, but it’s not impossible to experience the best of everything with little time management hacks. All in all, enjoy your time but do not let yourself drift away.

Read more: Perils of Graduation

5. Treat yourself!

While you go through the freshmen, sophomore and senior phases of the years you are in the University, you will realize that not all friendships last, not everyone you like will love you back, that society has constructions you wish you knew before, that there are these crowds who call themselves “boro bhais” and they are of no use to you and that is okay.

Read more: 5 Bangladeshi platforms where you can pitch your startup

With all the hardships you may think you have to face, there is also a beam of light which will get you through it all. You need to sleep well, eat healthy, make healthy relationships with people and they do not have to be a handful. Most importantly treat yourself after every accomplishment or failure you may face in life because before anyone else you need to learn to love yourself.

Here’s to figuring out adulthood and much more!

The curious case of BRAC University and its Pohela Boishakh

If you don’t stay under a rock, you should have come across all the memes making fun of BRAC University for celebrating Pahela Boishakh a week earlier. There were loads of trolls and some were actually funny. Most were also kind of hackneyed.

But why though?

First of all, we were told that it was not anything enforced. The students actually played a significant role in the decision as well. Mid-April is the time BRAC University holds its semester final exams. The exam season means no class, and thus the university remains closed.

“Well, we kind of wanted it to celebrate early. We always have our exams in Mid April, and thus it becomes difficult for everyone to attend. Moreover, as the university remains closed, things don’t become much festive.”

Sartaj Islam Shovon, a student of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, commented

“This was not much of a problem. The heat and everything were there. The program was good. The main thing is, we liked it. We mostly couldn’t enjoy in previous years due to exam pressure. This also becomes somewhat of a refreshment before the exams.”


Said Sabreen Alim, an energetic junior doing her BBA

Well, okay. If you put it like that..

All work and no play

Some students are a bit disappointed at the authority for always holding their exams at that time. But most students agree that their university has a specific academic calendar, and rigorous following of that prevents them from all kinds of session jams.

This very “legitimate” reason that was there for the early celebration of Pahela Baishakh is quite unknown to many. Hence, the flood of memes in our newsfeeds has tickled us to laugh, and also causing embarrassment to the people of BRACU at the same time.

Hey! look on the bright side

But, the people of BRAC University should not be disheartened in any way. They have a lot of positives to take from this.

1. Uninterrupted GoT binge

The most anticipated Episode of Game of Thrones will be released on 14th April. They can watch it staying at home, as they are already done with celebrating. BRACU people! Grab your popcorns, stay at your home, and watch your most awaited episode.

2. For the sake of memes!

This had provided some quality memes in our newsfeeds. Think of all the people you made laugh, BRACU people! In these tough times, having a good laugh is rare.

3. Cheap Hilsha! Yes!

Hilsha fish is quite costly in the Pahela Baishakh week. You have saved quite a significant chunk of money for yourselves eating Hilsha a week early. Think of all the productive things you can do with the saved money!

4. Festival hopping

Finally, this gives a chance to the BRACU students to explore the Pahela Baishakh program of other Universities! A golden opportunity to explore and getting out of your shell!

Dhaka: A city on the edge

I would like to begin this article by offering my condolences and heartfelt prayers to the victims of the fire tragedies and their families. Many acquaintances have been deeply affected by the incident. Relatives of a close friend of mine are still unaccounted for. The nightmare might have ended, but its effect lingers on.

It has been a few days since the flames at Chawkbazar of Puran Dhaka or FR tower in Banani have subsided. But the sizzling wounds the tragedies have left in our hearts may never heal. The horrifying incident of Chawkbazar left a death toll that may be anywhere between 60 and 200, depending on the news source you choose to believe. The number, as great as it actually may be or as small as those in control would want you to believe, can’t possibly deduct any amount of horror we have experienced here. Parts of the inferno caught on footage have made our blood run cold. One can’t even begin to imagine how it would have been to be there in person.

Facts and Speculations

Let’s talk about the Chawkbazar tragedy. There have been copious amounts of speculation and debate over the specifics of the Chawkbazar tragedy. Everything from the source of the fire to the death toll possesses conflicting reports.

The general consensus is that the chemical warehouses in the area contributed to the spread of the fire. This was heavily denied by a minister and some of the local homeowners, who insist that a gas cylinder from a pickup truck triggered the fire. So much so, during a live report on the incident, a commotion of “Cylinder” chants was heard in the background. Although these parties denied the presence of chemical warehouses in the Churihatta area, none of them denied the presence of a perfume and cosmetics warehouse. I was under the strange impression that those things are made of dangerous and flammable chemicals. Especially after reports of them shooting in every direction like firecrackers during the incident.

Snide remarks aside, the Department of Explosives has confirmed that the fire did indeed have flammable chemicals at its source of spread. They also uncovered an intact gas cylinder from the pick-up truck where the fire allegedly began.

A game of shadows is evidently at play, but I don’t really want to get into that. I would rather center this discussion around the potential consequences of our acts as a nation, perhaps even a species, that have been exposed to us by this tragedy.

The Seneca Cliff: A recipe for disaster

The Seneca Cliff is a mathematical model proposed by a Florentine professor of Physical Chemistry, Ugo Bardi. The name of the model is a reference to Latin Philosopher Seneca the Younger and his verse from Letters to Lucilius, “The rise is gradual, the fall precipitous.” The model deals with problems in nature that experience decline at a considerably faster rate than growth, under some constraints. A very apt example of this would be pollution caused by humans, which is fated to doom us all rather quicker than we anticipate.

That might sound alien to our discussion, but it is frighteningly relatable with what we have faced and are yet to face. Bangladesh is one of the largest deltas in the world and is very vulnerable to Natural Disasters. About 80% of our lands are floodplains, meaning the imminent rising of the sea level due to climate change is going to drown a big part of the country. Against this geographical disadvantage, even if the defense of our coastal lines were formidable, which they are not, would fall short.

Moreover, Bangladesh is situated on the very tectonically active Himalayan orogenic belt. The possibility of a large-scale earthquake has been very real for a very long time now. We are completely helpless if such an event should occur, as Dhaka is the second densest city in the world. And the faulty construction practices in our country has resulted in a staggering 80% of our buildings being non-engineered. Meaning they are very likely to collapse if an earthquake of magnitude 7.2 or above should hit us.

The precipitous fall

All this information adds up to a simple but horrifying fact.

We are sitting on a network of ticking time bombs primed for a devastating explosion.

Be it natural or induced by man, any disaster of considerable scale holds the potential to obliterate most of us. And we have played the role of a catalyst in this, we have accelerated the process of our own doom.

The Chawkbazar tragedy is a cardinal precedent of what we have brought upon ourselves. The streets of Puran Dhaka are infamously narrow and congested. The lightest drizzle waterlogs the area, the slightest vehicular mishap blocks an entire avenue. Could you imagine the ramifications if a large-scale disaster should hit this place? You don’t really need to, the fire showed us. Say the chemical warehouses were as conveniently innocent in the disaster as claimants would have you believe. How much sense does it make to even have chemical warehouses in a residential area in the first place? Especially if said residential area is as prone to mishap as Puran Dhaka? And if chemicals really didn’t contribute to the incident, they were in the vicinity. And when they do indeed contribute to another fire (approved by all this time), do we expect even greater consequences?

The poorly planned construction, the dangerous chemicals stored near residential areas, the inadequate coastal defense, all adds up to one thing. The greed and negligence we have adopted as a nation. We have operated with personal profit in mind on every wake of our daily lives. We have made towering fortresses with matchsticks underneath. The smallest spark will set off a chain explosion that ends us all. And if the Chawkbazar Tragedy has taught us anything, we are running out of time to undo our end.

How life in Dhaka University changes you

Dhaka University, along with all the universities around Bangladesh, has welcomed in their newest batch of pupils. Being in my final year as a Dhaka University student, it has been quite an experience seeing most of the freshers of different departments flocked together in TSC, Curzon Hall or in front of a random tea stall in the campus.

Dhaka University, despite all its flaws, will change the outlook of its pupils.

Whether it is good or bad, that remains a question. With that in mind- here’s how Dhaka University will change you.

But hey, if you want to go abroad, we can help you a little there too!

A bit of a culture shock

Dhaka University is a melting pot for all sorts of people around Bangladesh. It’s an entirely new scenario for a majority of the fresher’s. The first few weeks in DU can be a bit daunting for most, irrespective of whether they were born and raised in Dhaka or came from a remote suburb or village of another district.

For some, this culture shock might be a bit too much to handle. But asking anyone who has studied in DU for more than a semester, they will all more or less agree that waiting out the initial shock was totally worth it.

Judging a book by its cover

Judging people based on where they’ve come from or their background is one of the dumbest moves a fresher can make. Some of the best people you will meet in DU will probably have come from completely different backgrounds than yourself. DU gives its student a place to interact with hundreds of like-minded people. Don’t let something as minor as different backgrounds get in your way from achieving it. Be the first to introduce yourself to seniors, peers or juniors.

Learning to take responsibilities

Whenever a student is admitted into Dhaka University, he or she is pretty much thrown into the deep end when it comes to doing things by themselves. From giving tuition fees to filing for lost id cards, Dhaka university’s excessive bureaucracy will make you much more responsible whether you like it or not. And nothing sums up that expression more aptly than DU’s notorious “Registrar Building”. A place where according to myths, time slows down equivalent to travelling around a black hole. Freshers, you have been warned.

Becoming street smart

Being Street smart is always a great quality to have. And Dhaka University is the perfect space for even the rookies to hone this amazing quality. They know the right people for the right job. They can bargain to get a better rate on books or clothes in new market and Nilkhet. They have ideas about the best routes to travel around the city at minimal cost. These are just some of the things the students get a grasp on in just the first few months in DU. And we all know these things can’t be learnt from textbooks.

“Being here has definitely helped me become a better negotiator and conversationalist”

Says Amitabh Sarkar a third-year student.

Political awareness, because duh!

It’s generally quite hard not to be politically aware in most public university in Bangladesh. The credit goes to the culture of having student wings of most of the prominent political parties. Dhaka University is still the largest hub for student politics and activism in Bangladesh dating all the way back to the British era. Even in today’s political climate, DU still seen a bastion for free speech and progressive ideas and movements even with the ever-strengthening presence of Big Brother.

“However you don’t automatically become politically aware just by studying here. The truth is, awareness comes from the will to be aware. And comparatively, we do get the opportunities here”

Says a third year Peace and Conflict Studies student Megh Mallar Boshu.

Exploring the more artistic side of life

The artistic side of life draws you more? Then you cannot go wrong with DU. Take a stroll around Charukola compound. Attend the many concerts, poetry recitals, and movie screening.

It’s undeniable that DU nurtures the appreciation of different forms of art. The students’ associations, clubs, and societies work to showcase, promote, inspire and support many budding artists within the DU community.  

Afternoon tea breaks taken to a whole other level

DU students gain a newfound appreciation for tea. It is much more than just tea, it’s the whole experience. The afternoons at TSC with a cup of tea of your favorite kind and the mingling with virtually everyone. The heated conversations in those afternoons are the things that shape the person you turn out to be later on.

Dorm life and the bed bugs scourge

No DU experience is complete without staying at the dorms at least once in a while. And having a good friend or two who staying in dorms will make your time in university so much easier. The life in these dorms is no joke. People struggle the most during the tenure of their undergrad. But these five years of dorm life will teach you valuable life lessons that you can’t get anywhere else.

Where the real pride of Dhaka University lies

Cover art by: Helena Lyzu

The Hon’ble Vice-Chancellor of the University of Dhaka is in the limelight for some time now. This is because of his controversial speech in the orientation program of the freshmen students of Dhaka University. With major pronunciation mistakes, he stated that “You cannot find a cup of tea along with a piece of chap, singara, and samusa for only Tk 10 anywhere in the world.”

I believe that there are many other areas in which Dhaka University can be proud of other than this astounding achievement.

The alumni of this 97 years old university have taken the name University of Dhaka to a new height from time to time.

So, here is a list of ten Dhaka University Alumni who have played role in securing the justified pride of Dhaka University.

Humayun Ahmed

Humayun Ahmed. This name is a source of all kinds of emotions to thousands of people. He is still the most popular Bangladeshi writer and it can be easily predicted that he will remain so in the upcoming years. Humayun Ahmed is the author of Nondito Noroke and many other highly praised literary works. He received Bangla Academy Award in 1981 and received six Bangladesh National Film Awards later on. His famous TV series Kotaho Keu Nei was highly popular among the Bangladeshis. The popularity can be measured through the protest that happened in Bangladesh due to the death of the central character. He is certainly a pride of Dhaka University.

Zahir Raihan

The legendary Bangladeshi novelist, filmmaker and writer went missing on 30 January 1972. Jahir Raihan was a warrior with a camera. Even today we see footage from his documentary Stop Genocide every time there is news about the liberation war of Bangladesh. Our film industry has very few classics and some of those belong to this brilliant filmmaker. When asked about Zahir Raihan, Dhaka University Film Society member Mahmudul Hasan replied in one word, “Phenomenon”. This Ekushey Padak winner studied at Dhaka University. 

Munier Choudhury

This Bangladeshi educationist, playwright and literary critic completed his Masters’ from the University of Dhaka in 1947. We all have read or seen the drama Kabar at some point in our lives. This symbolic drama was created by Munier Chowdhury. He received Bangla Academy literary award in 1962.

Dr. Muhammad Yunus

The first ever Bangladeshi Nobel Peace Prize winner also studied at the University of Dhaka. His work against poverty is appreciated worldwide. He has a long list of awards and achievements. If all these things don’t make him the pride of any institution, then I don’t know what will. 

Satyendra Nath Bose

No, this famous physicist didn’t study at the University of Dhaka, but he was appointed as a teacher in the Physics department in 1921. He wrote his paper on quantum radiation from here. This paper is now considered as the base of quantum statistics throughout the world. I guess this is enough for him to enter the list of Pride of DU.

Humayun Azad

Many consider him the second most contributing person to Bangla Literature after Dr. Muhammad Shahidullah. His thesis paper titled as Pronominalizing in Bengali (1983) gained much fame. His literary works are also noteworthy. Although he generated much controversy through his feminist viewed books, his contribution to Bengali cannot be denied. He is also considered as a role model to many for his bravery. He studied and taught in the University of Dhaka and was awarded Bangla Academy Literary Award.

Leela Roy

Ever asked the question, who was the first woman to study at the University of Dhaka? Here is your answer.

She was also elected as the member of the assembly in 1946. Leela Roy is considered as the feminist idol of this sub-continent. She was politically involved in a time when women were considered as only housewives. She placed herself well into this list.

Abdul Matin Chowdhury

This ex-VC of Dhaka University has also placed himself on this list. Even during the Pakistani era, prof. Chowdhury was appointed as the chief scientist of Ministry of Defense. He was also in the committee for Nobel prize in physics. In 1974, prof. Matin became the first Bose professor.

Buddhadeva Bose or Buddhadeb Bosu

This Padma Bhushan awardee studied literature at the University of Dhaka. Many know him for his poetry, but he was a versatile writer who traveled almost every arena of literature. He is considered as the most impactful poets of modern Bangla poetry. He is one of the most reputed writers in Bengali Literature and he is certainly a pride of the University of Dhaka.

Shahabuddin Ahmed

The only painter in this list. He studied at the Dhaka Art College which is now the Faculty of Fine Arts, University of Dhaka. He was awarded Chevalier De L’ordre Des Arts Et Des Lettres (Knight in the Order of Fine Arts and Humanities) by the Ministry of Cultural Affair and Communication of France in 2014. His paintings are displayed in many prestigious museums across the whole world. He was also awarded Shadhinata Padak in 2000.

Hon’ble Mention

It was too tough to sort out 10 Alumni of the University of Dhaka, who can be a pride to the university. I won’t be able to sleep at night if I don’t put one more name here. So, the Hon’ble mention goes to:

Tareque Masud

This honorable filmmaker got his fame for his amazingly portrayed films. He was awarded the FIPRESCI Prize for his film Matir Moyna (The Clay Bird). This film was the first film of Bangladesh to compete in the Academy Awards. He completed his masters’ degree in History from the University of Dhaka.

Even though I am not a student at the University of Dhaka, the speech of the Hon’ble VC hurt me. I am pretty sure that it would’ve hurt them as well.  The University of Dhaka has many things to be proud of and the food is not one of those. Give respect where respect is due. Thank you.

Perils of Graduation

Do you remember your first day at school? Do you remember all the unfamiliar faces, the wave of anxiety at every step, trying not to cry and crying anyway? If you do, you’ll know that all those “First day at school” paragraphs were nothing but blatant lies. Even if you don’t, you can imagine how scary that must be for a little child of 3 or 4 years of age, right?

If anything is scarier than that, it is the day you graduate. For the months leading up to your graduation, you will feel the same tension, same uncertainty, and of course, the same fear. And these are the reasons why.

1. You are suddenly an adult

It is easy to keep the real life at an arm’s length when you are a student. You are dependent on your parents, you do not feel the urgency to get a real job. You’re stressing over your grades, you’re hanging out with your friends- that is all your life consists of. But the second you graduate, you start to notice the little things. You start to notice that your father gets a little too tired. You see that your mother isn’t as lively as she used to be. As hard as it is to accept- you realize that your parents ARE getting old, and it’s time for you to take on the responsibilities. And you, who needed permission to stay out past 7 PM just a few days ago, are suddenly left to deal with this enormous truth all by yourself.

2. You have no idea what to do

Here’s the thing- getting a job is hard. It is a lot harder when you don’t exactly know what you want to do. For most of us, we get our degrees in a certain field, and then we realize that working in that field might just be impossible. So, all on a sudden, you don’t know where you want to see yourself in 5 years of time. This is the reason why a lot of fresh graduates grab onto the first job opportunity that they come across, and after 20 years you have an adult who is unhappy with what they have achieved so far.

3. You are expected to have it all figured out.

Perils of Graduation 2

When you graduate, everyone else seems to know what you should do with your life, except for you. So you’re done with studies? Get ready for BCS, get ready to get married, get ready to “settle down”. You will be constantly reminded that your life should fit into this socially acceptable mold of success- and being different is not an option. Even if you try to be different, you will be weighed down with the guilt of not fitting in. And at some point you will just turn into another brick in the wall.


The years went by preternatural speed. I had thought I had enough time to figure things out by the time I graduate. But truth is I haven’t figured anything out yet. I feel like I’m not any wiser than when I was a freshman.I still don’t know where I’m going with my life

Alisha Amin, An Economics Graduate from Dhaka University

4. You drift apart from your friends.

Perils of Graduation 1

Everybody gets busy with their own lives after graduation. It might sound crude, but your friends will not have as much time for you once you all get out of university. It is nobody’s fault- it is simply hard to maintain a social life when you’re working from 9 to 5 every day. So from meeting once a week, you will go to meeting once every two weeks, then a month- and before you realize you stop hanging out altogether. And the sheer weight of this realization is enough to throw you off guard, isn’t it?

5. The uncertainty is excruciating.

Up until this point, you have had a clear vision of where you are heading next. But when you graduate, you will realize that you no longer have that vision- and accepting that you are utterly lost will be excruciating. Not knowing if you are cut out for this dog-eat-dog world will take a toll on you. But you will get used to it.

The hardest part of being a graduate is not the uncertainty, nor the responsibilities. It’s the epiphany that you are a grown up now. And unlike when you were 4, you cannot just run from it and hide behind your mother. You have to take every hit, and breaking down under the pressure is not an option anymore. If that is not scary, what is?

But we have scared you enough. Don’t let us get to your head and thrive. We wish you all the best for this upcoming stage of your life. Cheers!