Ferar Gaan: The first Bangladeshi short made entirely with a Smartphone

Ferar Gaan: The first Bangladeshi short made entirely with a Smartphone 3

Let us begin with an analogy. Steven Soderbergh’s latest film High Flying Bird was shot entirely on a smartphone. Referring to this award-winning director, it is like ‘writing script in pencil’. The director replied so to his fellow visionary director, Christopher Nolan, when Nolan challenged him to go back to shooting on film. This thrilling dunk had its world premiere at the Slamdance Film Festival earlier this year. It received accolades from both the critics and the audiences.

Technology and filmmaking

When it comes to film making, one would surely think of new technological advent in equipment. But in reality, there are a lot of things that will appear with that thinking which may confine the opportunity of becoming a film-maker, when you also have the chance to shoot your dream with just a smartphone. Soderbergh and other directors prove that it’s not about the camera, the best camera you got probably in your pocket to make your vision into reality.

Ferar Gaan: The first Bangladeshi short made entirely with a Smartphone

Our celebrated director Shafayet Mansoor Rana took the idea further and decided to try his hand at writing his script in the metaphorical pencil and it certainly worked. He successfully delivered the first ever professional production completely shot on a smartphone in Bangladesh. The film, Ferar Gaan, was released last week as the iflix original on this popular streaming platform. The film has been entirely shot using Samsung flagship smartphone Galaxy S10+. 

The plot

In the opening sequence of this short, we see two men looking for an address quite frantically. When they finally get to their desired destination, the person gets shell shocked and falls to the ground with awe and the title pops-up on the screen. The director pushes us back to two months earlier. The film is starred by rock icon Jon Kabir, popular actor Azmeri Asha and Sayeed Zaman Shawon. This short is split into three chapters which portrayed the vicissitudes of the life of Rubab Khan, the famous star played by Jon Kabir.

Ferar Gaan: The first Bangladeshi short made entirely with a Smartphone 2

The plot revolves around him, his music, his fame, his losses and how he reclaims his lost kingdom with the strike of a moment of epiphany. Rubab Khan was very popular and surrounded by millions of fans, but his ego and snobbishness made him fall from the sky. On his prime, one day, a diehard fan of Rubab Khan, played by Sayeed Zaman Shawon, made his way to the backstage despite strict restrictions and asked for a selfie with his icon. In response, he got a tight slap and very rude behavior from his icon and later was thrown out by the guards. The very next morning, Rubab finds out that he has lost his gifted voice. And eventually, he lost everything including his fascinating career, his fans, and even his girlfriend, played by Azmeri Asha. 

Filmmaking with smartphone

The story of Ferar Gaan is penned by Tanvir Chowdhury, the person behind the operation of the camera is Sumon Sarkar and the uplifting music is composed by Fuad Al Muktadir. Ferar Gaan was shot entirely with Samsung Galaxy S10+ which features three rear professional grade cameras consisting of a 12MP wide lens, 12MP telephoto lens, and 16MP Ultra-Wide lens which records 4000 pixels horizontally video very easily. No additional lenses were being used to shoot the film. And the director didn’t do much manipulation after shooting, thanks to Samsung’s ground-breaking innovation.

Ferar Gaan: The first Bangladeshi short made entirely with a Smartphone 1

Anyone would love the fact about making a movie with the handiest yet advantageous device like Samsung S10+ that they can make a very quick decision and perform creative execution albeit spending very less than shooting with the equipment screams movie camera. As Soderbergh said, ‘If you want the lens on the wall, you don’t have to cut a hole in the wall and put the camera behind it. It’s a great tool.’

The creative duo Shafayet Mansoor Rana and Sumon Sarkar carried out an experiment with a spontaneous style which delivered the audiences a worth-watching 40-minutes story of redemption. That has the merit to revive the viewers with sparkling momentum.